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iBID Information Service

iBID News

From a survey of all burn services and contributors to the iBID in 2015 it was clear that there was a desire to have access to the national dataset to allow flexible queries to be applied to national data.  It was felt the current series of reports provided were too restrictive.

We have been working on a means of providing access to anonymised data, safely and securely, since that time. In addition we have focused the emailed reports into a series to provide information on data quality and completeness and supporting information for audit.One of the limitations in developing the online iBID Information Service was the need for all data to be held within a single software system which was not fully achieved until mid-2016.

The iBID Information Service is now ready for release, it can be accessed only from computers connected to the NHS net. Details of how to access the Service will be circulated soon. Users are asked to inspect the system and provide comments concerning its refinement and development to the iBID office for collation.

 

Site Specific Reports

iBID News

The latest analysis of site specific reports have now been produced and sent out. Each quarter a series of reports are produced and sent directly to Burn Services.

Some historic reports are available under your site specific log-in details. These log-in details are available from your Burn Care Network Manager. The use of a site specific password, or specific access rights using a registered name and password is necessary to gain access.

All reports are derived using the most recently updated iBID software, which has successfully been deployed in all English and Welsh Burn Services. The reports are based on some of the the original templates in use over recent years but have been reduced in number in line with user feedback.

The plan is to put in place a far more comprehensive set of web based reporting tools, configurable by the user. The iBID Information Service is due for release in early 2017.

Some general reports are accessible to non-registered / public users. The design of burn service reports for public use is under way and drafts have been circulated to stakeholders for comment. It is anticipated that stakeholders will inform the Burn Care Informatics Group how best to publish these.

Please take a look and suggest any changes that might be helpful. . . .

Any identified problems will be dealt with - some will be local and may need resolution by the Burn Service with support from the Burn Care Network Manager, whilst others may represent technical problems requiring support from the iBID team centrally.

 

Telereferral system in burn care, Jun 2015

iBID News

A presentation was made to the British Association of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons meeting in London concerning the development of a Tele-referral system for burn injuries.

Pilot of an online burns referral system - by: Dr VE Ormston, Mrs C Reade, Mr R Hollingsworth, Mr KW Dunn

Introduction: An online burns referral system has been designed and produced on behalf of NHS England and the burn care Clinical Reference Group. It is being piloted in Greater Manchester with the intention of being rolled out nationally. Referrals are submitted online by the referrer using an NHS Net web link the only requirement being the need to submit an NHS e-mail address. Clinical photographs and x-ray images can be attached to the electronic referral.

Material and Methods: The online burns referral system was developed with the software consultancy MDSAS (Medical Data Solutions and Services). It is being piloted within the Greater Manchester region to replace the current system of faxed referrals.

Key results: The benefits of the new referral system include no requirement for pre-registration of the referrer, it avoids losing faxed referrals thus improving patient safety, confidentiality and security of information. There is improved referral information provided which is clear and typed and imaging sent with the referral will facilitate decision making particularly the need to transfer out of area. Login to the system can occur from any NHS computer and an auditable trail of the referral process is retained.

Conclusion: An online system for the referral of burns patients is being piloted. The system allows electronic referrals with clinical images to be sent by the referrer, without requiring registration of the referrer. The technique is applicable to other specialties where the review of imaging would be of benefit during the referral process.

 

Panhellenic Congress - Athens, Oct 2013

iBID News

Keynote lecture: Costs of burns and plastic surgery: The UK experience

Abstract: The growing cost of healthcare is of concern to every society globally.  Its importance has been brought into stark relief by the economic crisis seen in many parts of the world and Europe in particular.  A great many pieces of work have looked at healthcare costs and claimed to represent the cost of therapeutic interventions but a review of the global literature on this subject has revealed systematic errors of methodology in the majority. A common feature in the literature is confusion between charges made by a hospital and the true cost of the care provided if calculated by other methodologies.

A long-term programme of work in England has been focused particularly on burns and plastic surgery in an attempt to establish the true cost of care provided on a patient by patient basis. The findings of this work have indicated that some of the conclusions commonly held are indeed correct:  Staff time and input to a particular patient is the single largest cost driver to the cost of the care that patient receives by that a surprisingly small contribution to the overall cost is made by disposables, be they implants, injectables, dressing materials etc.

By understanding the details behind departmental income and by breaking down burns and plastic surgery workloads into different clinical silos it is possible to identify those areas of work which are profitable to a department and a hospital while identifying some surprisingly important areas of work make a loss but may be acting as effective loss leaders.  It can be concluded that clinician perceptions of cost are frequently inaccurate.

It is hoped this work will form the basis of a more rational and accurate understanding of the costs of surgical care in burn and plastic surgery and might hopefully lead in certain health economies to a more rational and accurate approach to surgical care remuneration and even service organisation and capacity.

 

 

 

European Burns Assoc - Vienna, Aug 2013

iBID News

Introduction: In the UK, burn injuries are estimated to cause around 13K admissions every year and they have a mortality of approximately 1.2%. But these are just estimates since no study has been made that can demonstrate the true incidence and prevalence of burn injuries. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical epidemiology of burn injuries for the years 2003-2011

Methods: Data form international Burn Injury Database, which is the database for specialised services, were analysed for all admissions (2003-11) in England and Wales. Data was broken down according to age, sex and Primary Care Trusts. Admission rates were adjusted for world population according to World Health Organization population tables.

Results: Admissions for males accounted for 63% and the remaining 37% to females. The mean burn surface area was 3.98 (95% 3.92-4.04). The most frequent reason for burn injury admission was scald (38%). The median age group was 10-<20 for all years with the exception of 2011 which was 1-<10yrs.   Mortality was overall 1.25. Admissions based on sex and age were highest for the age groups 1-<10yrs for both genders.

 

Conclusion: Mortality from burn injuries is decreasing, a finding that follows the western world trends. There is an increase in admissions in burn services but that could be an artefact of the database being used from all services over the passage of time. These results will be vital for service development and planning as well as prevention strategies and commissioning.

 
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